Cheap Pocket Knives – Blades That Fit in Your Wallet

If you buy a high-end pocket knife from any of the big knife companies such as Benchmade or Zero Tolerance, then you’ll probably end up paying over a hundred bucks for a single stabber. You usually get what you pay for (some of which may be the name brand), but that doesn’t mean there don’t exist quality blades that don’t cost more than a Franklin.

I’m sure most people would rather not spend more than they have to on something as simple as a knife (even though they’re probably the most useful tools ever), so I’ve compiled a list of some cheap pocket knives that are still functional. If you’ve been hesitant to get yourself a dedicated pocket knife, then this may be your big break.

All that said, let’s jump right into it!

Kershaw Cinder

SIZE
WEIGHT

This one is small and a bit unusually shaped, but it’s also the cheapest knife on this list by a long shot. The blade is only 1.4 inches long, so don’t expect to cut a block a cheese with it. However, for what it can do, it’s well worth double the price.

The fun-sized sheepsfoot blade is great for controlled cutting, a trait that’s invaluable for a knife of this size. It includes a bottle opener at the tail in case you’re into opening bottles. It also has a keychain hole to make life that much more convenient. Overall, this is a very good blade and, if you’re new to the folding knife scene, there’s hardly a better way to start than with the Kershaw Cinder, especially for the price.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

3.9 inches
2.5 inches
3CR13 steel
glass-filled nylon
0.9 ounces
~$10

CRKT M16-01KS

Size
WEIGHT

Probably the most dangerous-looking knife on this list, the M16 is surprisingly small but still big enough for almost anything you could ask of it. It has a very unique look, almost like a submarine or other underwater mechanism. But regardless of what it looks like, it’s a tool that definitely won’t fail when you need it.

As a simple drop-point, the blade is suited for most general usage where slicing and stabbing are needed. It features the Carson Flipper opening mechanism where you flip a knob from the back of the handle, which is safer than a knob on the spine of the blade, although a bit more awkward. If you’re looking for a simple knife that’s not more complicated than it needs to be, then be sure to give the M16 a try.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.1 inches
4.0 inches
8Cr14MoV steel
stainless steel
2.6 ounces
~$30

SOG Salute Mini

Size
Weight

This knife looks everything like a typical folder but it isn’t all show. It has three inches of cutting potential attached to a durable G-10 handle that make for a more-than-decent tool. SOG knives can be hit or miss and this one definitely has its flaws, but it’s an all-around solid cutter.

The biggest concern seems to be its stiffness, specifically in the opening mechanism and pocket clip. If you don’t mind a bit of stubbornness though, then the Salute Mini may be worth a shot. And it’s hard to argue with the letters “SOG” carved into the clip (as if the knife wasn’t plastered enough with the brand name).

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.1 inches
4.0 inches
8Cr13MoV steel
G-10 glass fiber
3.6 ounces
~$30

Spyderco Byrd Meadowlark

Size
Weight

You might think this is a rip-off of the famed Spyderco Delica knife, but it’s more like a spin-off if anything. The Byrd brand is a sub-department of Spyderco and specializes in budget knives. But despite the cut in price and quality, they’re still great knives, and the Meadowlark is no exception.

The biggest differences between this knife and the more expensive Delica is the use of cheaper materials and the oddly-shaped hole in the handle instead of a circle (which apparently makes it easier to open). Also, you don’t have any color choices for the handle, which could be either good or bad. Definitely give the Meadowlark some thought if you’ve been wanting a Spyderco knife but don’t want to hand over all that cha-chinga.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

6.8 inches
3.9 inches
8Cr13MoV steel
fiberglass nylon
2.4 ounces
~$30

Kershaw Chill

Size
Weight

This knife seems to fit the name very well, but I’m not sure why. I’m guessing it either gets really cold or it has an appearance such that you would get chills just by looking at it. It’s definitely a cool-looking knife, though, and probably not something you’d want to mess around with.

It has a strikingly simple design with no markings on the handle or blade save for the technical stuff. The blade is deployed with a knob on the back of the handle and stays in place with a linerlock mechanism. It also has a reversible clip, but just on one side (the blade can point either up or down). Needless to say, this knife will suit anybody looking for a bit of subtlety with their folders.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.0 inches
3.5 inches
8Cr13MoV
G-10 glass fiber
2.1 ounces
~$20

Gerber Quadrant

Size
Weight

Here’s a knife that earns its place mostly because of its looks. At first glance, it might look more like a comb than anything, but it’s just a very squared-off blade. And the highlight of bamboo reminds me of my diffuser (because diffusers invented bamboo). 

I would say this knife is more than just style, but it just barely passes that mark. Don’t get me wrong, though, it’s still a great knife, it just seems to have a lot of trouble with its opening mechanism. But if you can get past its shortcomings, then you’ll certainly be hard-pressed to find a blade more unique than the Gerber Quadrant.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

6.7 inches
4.0 inches
7Cr17MoV steel
bamboo
4.8 ounces
~$30

Victorinox Tinker Swiss Army Knife

Size
Weight

It’s hard to go wrong with a Swiss Army knife, especially if you’re looking for a blade on a budget. The Tinker is one of the cheapest tools under the Victorinox brand and it’s also one of the simplest. You’ll never regret putting one in your pocket (unless you just entered airport security).

The Tinker has functions such as a screwdriver, a bottle opener, and a sewing awl. Not to mention the two sizes of blades for two sizes of situations (not to mention the blade on the can opener). If you’re a bit of a traditionalist, then you can’t go wrong with the Victorinox Tinker. 

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

6.5 inches
3.3 inches
stainless steel
ABS scales
1.9 ounces
~$20

Spyderco Tenacious

Size
Weight

This probably doesn’t live up to the standards of this list because it is a bit expensive, but I figured I’d put it on anyways. It’s not taking any shortcuts in terms of Spyderco quality but the price tag is still relatively low. It’s what you could think of as a “real” pocket knife (although there is no such qualification).

The Tenacious is a no-frills blade with excellent materials and superb craftsmanship. In short, it’ll cut stuff. And with it’s four-position clip, you’ll really be unstoppable. So, if you don’t want to settle for a budget knife but still don’t want to empty your wallet, then the Tenacious is what you’re looking for.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.8 inches
4.2 inches
8Cr13MoV steel
G-10 glass fiber
3.5 ounces
~$50

Those have been some cheap pocket knives for people who would like to carry a blade with them but would also rather not empty their wallets. A budget knife may not be as rigorous as a high-end one, but it’s still great for less-demanding tasks like peeling an orange. Actually, I’m not sure any food product would be a match for you as long as you have your trusty edge. You might even send card stock and relatively small branches running in all directions. Basically, if it can be cut, you’ll be able to cut it. And now I’ll cut it out.

Hopefully you found this article helpful. If you have any questions or concerns (or just like to type stuff), then be sure to leave a comment below and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

10 thoughts on “Cheap Pocket Knives – Blades That Fit in Your Wallet

  1. Hello there, nice article on ” cheap pocket knives”

    No one would like to spend so much in getting just a pocket knife, wether branded or not! If there are other quality products that can can do same job as the branded ones and is cheap, I will sure go for it. The ” kenshaw cinder” does it for me because it is cheap for the qualities it possess.

    1. Hi Lizzychris,

      You are right that a lot of people would rather not spend hundreds of bucks on a tool as simple as a pocket knife and a cheap blade will often do the job almost as good as a Benchmade. I’m also a fan of the Kershaw Cinder due to its small size paired with a surprisingly comfortable grip.

  2. People would wonder why someone would want to buy a pocket knife but the fact remains that there are situations you might find yourself looking for a handy pocket knife to help you out, so trust me you won’t know just when you need it.
    On this article reviewed are the best cheap affordable Kershaw pocket knives that would best fit your pocket, make a choice and your will definitely see its important some time soon

    1. Hi Evans,

      You make some good points. If somebody doesn’t carry a knife around with them, they probably don’t know how helpful it can be. And starting out with a cheap knife is a great way to go.

  3. thanks for sharing such an awesome article. Knowing the price of knife, we enable you plan and have the kind of knife you wish to have.knife blades are of different size and products, you can afford anyone that suits ur preference or finance though all still performs same function though. 

    thanks best regards. 

    1. You definitely don’t have to spend too much money to get a good knife. Especially if you’re just starting out, a cheap knife is a great option and can last a long time if taken care of.

  4. Hello, thank you very much for this awesome article. There is a number of “knives” there that might fit in your wallet. The majority of them do not provide you with a real secure grip, a quality blade and anything approaching actual function as a result.. this is insightful. thank you very much

    1. Hi Smoochi,

      Although it’s said that you get what you pay for, sometimes it’s just not necessary to fork out hundreds of bucks for something as simple as a knife. Of course, you’ll never find a cheap knife that’s of the same quality as a high-end Benchmade, but if you’re anything like me, a budget knife will do the trick. Like you said, though, many cheap knifes will have poor grip or just all-around bad functionality, so it’s important to keep that in mind.

  5. Hello there! These knives are are wonderful. For me, though I love their features but I’ll go for “Spyderco Byrd Meadowlark” as it’s almost the same with the one I’m using presently ( E Z OUT). I cant wait for this whole lockdown thing to be over so I go get new knives.

     Thanks for sharing, I love it!

     

    1. Hi Chimmhogevagreenesnr,

      The Spyderco Byrd is a great option and is fairly easy to open especially with the Spyderco blade hole. It is a bit rough on the edges, though, which can be hard on your fingers, but it’s an overall great knife. Also, Gerber’s EZ Out is another good one (it’s easy to open, as the name implies). I’m glad you enjoyed the article!

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