The Best Kershaw Pocket Knives – Some Really Good Points

Although this knife brand sounds like something out of a comic book (a bit onomatopoetic perhaps), it’s simply the last name of a guy called Pete, who happens to be the person that started the whole thing. Kershaw produces many types of knives from sporting knives to kitchen cutlery. They’re even the ones behind the appraised Zero Tolerance line of pocket knives, which are designed for the most precarious situations.

Kershaw started in 1974 when that Pete guy decided to leave his employment at Gerber Legendary Blades to start his own company. The headquarters of Kershaw are located in Tualatin, Oregon, but some of their products are imported from Japan and China.

Today, we’ll be looking at this brand’s main line of pocket knives. It’s hard to go wrong with a Kershaw knife, but I’ve narrowed the choices down a bit to make things easier. That said, let’s jump into some of the best Kershaw pocket knives in existence.

Kershaw Link

SIZE
WEIGHT

Starting off the list is Link, which is apparently the link between high-end knives and casual consumers, at least in terms of affordability. It has a very simplistic design, which definitely lends to its style, but it’s not all show. This sleek tool doesn’t compromise on performance and it won’t hesitate to prove it.

Equipped with a quality 420HC steel blade and an anodized aluminum handle, Link will have no problem cutting through the toughest materials while still retaining its edge. And its SpeedSafe opening mechanism will ensure a smooth experience. It also comes in a few different colors and handle types in case you want a style other than dark and brooding. This knife is a great pick if you don’t want to empty your wallet and, with the heart of a warrior, it will no doubt come through when you need it most.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.6 inches
4.4 inches
420HC steel
anodized aluminum
4.7 ounces
~$40

Kershaw Shuffle II

Size
WEIGHT

This knife is very conveniently sized and perfect for carrying around. It may not be the smallest knife ever (which is a good thing because really tiny knives are impractical), but it’s definitely light enough to forget it in your pocket.

The Shuffle II features a durable tanto blade that’s perfect for poking and stabbing. The extreme texturing on its handle also helps it not fall out of your hand during use. Not to mention the added screwdriver and bottle opener at the end of the knife, which could always come in handy. For everything that this blade delivers, it’s hard to argue with the price. If you’re looking for small and cheap, then this may be the knife for you.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

6.5 inches
4.0 inches
8Cr14MoV steel
glass-nylon
2.0 ounces
~$20

Kershaw Brawler

Size
Weight

A bit polygonal in appearance, the Brawler is a sleek and sturdy knife with a nice tactical look. It even has some features that would appear on a high-stakes blade (except this one wasn’t made for life-or-death situations). But don’t think this knife is any sort of wimp—for the price, it’s got more punch than you’d expect.

The biggest distinguishing feature on this model is the inclusion of a swedge (or false edge) on the spine of the blade, which makes it a better stabber. It’s not sharpened of course, but it can still provide that extra oomph. If you’re all about style, then the Brawler is good and cheap way to get a versatile knife that puts on a show.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.1 inches
4.1 inches
8Cr13MoV steel
glass-nylon
3.9 ounces
~$30

Kershaw Knockout

Size
Weight

You could say that the Knockout is the chronological sequel to the Brawler, but I’ll leave it to you to figure out who bested whom. As far as the knife goes, though, it has a nice flowing design on the handle, but also really knocks it out of the park in terms of simple quality.

With a basic drop-point edge, this knife is perfect for any general task you could ask of it. It can carve things, stab things, and maybe even shave things. The only real knock this blade has received is that the tip of the blade will chip, but really, so will any knife given enough wear and tear. I don’t want to knock a dead horse here, but if you want a high-end knife that’s super versatile and easy to control, then this knife will be a good knock and then some. And I almost forgot to tell you one of my favorite jokes that [removed by moderator].

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Price:

7.8 inches
4.3 inches
14C28N steel
anodized aluminum
4.0 ounces
~$70

Kershaw Barge

Size
Weight

It might take you a second to figure out where the blade is and isn’t on this one. I don’t blame you—it’s certainly a unique design as far as pocket knives go and a little bit disorienting. And although the handle may be longer, it has more functionality than any typical pocket knife. The length also means more cutting control, which is always a plus.

The Barge sports a moderately-sized sheepsfoot blade, which is great for chopping things with precision. And if you’re wondering what that “extra blade” is at the butt, it’s a pry bar. This means that next time you lend your knife to a friend, they won’t have to chip your edge trying to get a nail out of the wall. So, if you think you’d use a pry bar enough to have one permanently attached to your knife or you just want an unnecessarily long handle, then be sure to give the Barge a try.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.6 inches
5.0 inches
8Cr13MoV steel
glass-nylon
5.4 ounces
~$20

Kershaw Blur

Size
Weight

Unlike the other knives, this one has a very rounded contour, which makes for a more comfortable grip. It’s simple, but made with top-of-the-line materials that won’t fail you in a hurry.

The drop-point blade is composed of S30V powdered steel, which is exceptionally dense and perfect for holding an edge. It also has a stonewashed finish for smudge-free handling. The Blur is definitely something to consider if you want to cut to the chase and avoid worrying about extraneous specifications.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.1 inches
3.7 inches
S30V steel
anodized aluminum
4.5 ounces
~$70

Kershaw Skyline

Size
Weight

The Skyline is hailed as one of the best Kershaw knives for its durable blade, smooth opening system, and lightweight design, all of which is at a relatively low price point. The manufacturers are even convinced that if you haven’t carried a knife in your pocket before, this will be the tool to convert you. I don’t know if I would go that far, but it’s definitely a good pick for those new to the scene.

The blade is made of quality steel for clean cutting and the handle is composed of G-10 scales for extra grippy usage. It also has a nice big contour cut out for your index finger, which adds that much more stability when cutting. And the opening mechanism is a flipper on the back of the handle so you don’t have to risk cutting your fingers. The Skyline is great for anyone with a mid-range budget who wants a pretty good knife.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.6 inches
4.5 inches
14C28N steel
G-10 glass fiber
2.5 ounces
~$40

Kershaw Leek

Size
Weight

You might notice something strange about this one. No, it’s not the fact that it shares the same name as a vegetable. Rather, it’s that it has a copper-colored line running wild through the middle of the blade. Other than that, though, it’s a pretty normal-looking knife.

In order to capture the best worlds of two separate metals, the Leek has a blade composed of both 14C28N and D2 steel (basically just really good steel). The D2 is great at holding an edge and is put on the sharp side while the other steel with the long name is primarily for support. I can’t fully get behind the look of the thing, but have to admit, it’s super unique. So, if you want your cutting tool to be super special and also like to look at squiggly lines, then there’s no better knife for the job. Just be ready to fork over a bit of cha-chinga.

Overall Length:
Closed Length:
Blade Material:
Handle Material:
Weight:
Estimated Cost:

7.1 inches
4.0 inches
14C28N & D2 steel
stainless steel
3.0 ounces
~$60

Those have been some of the best Kershaw pocket knives on the market. Now next time you’re at a party and someone asks if anyone has a knife, you’ll be able to whip yours out like a cool person. Of course, that also means there’s a chance the person you lent the knife to won’t realize that the edge of a blade wasn’t designed to open a can of paint, and. . .well, I suppose in that case you’d just have to carry two knives around. 

Hopefully you found this article helpful. If you have any questions or concerns (or just want to write stuff) then be sure to leave a comment below and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

4 thoughts on “The Best Kershaw Pocket Knives – Some Really Good Points

  1. I really enjoy your site a lot hence I am making a comment on another of your articles here. I have to say I know that you are not sold on the look of the Kershaw Leek but i think its radical! The science behind its construction is convincing and there is every chance that this little gem is going to end up in my collection.

    Another great post thanks

    Hamish

    1. Hi Hamish,

      I could get behind the look of the Leek if the line wasn’t so unruly, but I do think it’s a cool knife. It’s also super interesting and unique with the science of its design like you said. The Leek is definitely a hidden gem! I’m glad you’re enjoyed this article!

  2. This is a pretty funny article talking About knives, although at a point one could need pocket knives for various urgent reasons but am not a fan of knives. I reluctantly dont love and will never get to love knives regardless its built because to me all it Doe’s is cause harm to people.
    Its a fact to Kershaw over the years have series of products which I do petronise them on but definitely not their knives bti if you really want my opinion from these presented pocket knives I would recommend the Kershaw link for you cos I have seen its beautiful nature.

    1. Hi Evans,

      I can understand your take on knives as an EDC tool. If not used properly, they can hurt innocent people. However, just like a well-kept fire can provide warmth, a responsibly-used knife can be a great tool.

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